August 24, 2017

POLL: Pick a Baxter Plant

Summer’s here, it’s an election year and we’re taking a vote.

Which plant should we sponsor in the quest to catalog the flora of Baxter State Park?

Read on to learn more about each candidate or vote now for the plant species you think we should sponsor.

Help Us Pick a Baxter Plant

  • Trillium erectum - Red trillium (73%, 11 Votes)
  • Viburnum lantanoides - Hobblebush (27%, 4 Votes)
  • Sibbaldiopsis tridentata - Three-toothed cinquefoil (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Chrysosplenium americanum - Water carpet (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 15

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Glen Mittelhauser, executive director of the Maine Natural History Observatory and co-conspirator on Wild Wednesday here at Garden Maine, is involved in this project.

Here’s the link to go read up on this amazing project for the park, which does not have any type of guide to the flora located within Baxter’s boundaries. And the really cool thing is that you can do a couple of things to help in this historic effort: sponsor a plant species and donate to the project.

We just had to sponsor our very own species, and what better way than to take a vote on which one should be Garden Maine’s species. We asked Glen to recommend a few species that we could consider sponsoring and he sent us back a doozy of a list.

What’s involved in sponsoring a plant species? “This type of donation will help us to:  1) document the abundance and distribution of a plant species in Baxter State Park; 2) assemble field data into a database for Park managers; 3) write field keys and species description for the field guide; and 4) assemble the best photographs.  To Sponsor a Plant Species, click on the ‘Donate’ button on the homepage (requested donation $25/species although any amount accepted) and in the ‘Purpose’ field, write ‘Baxter Flora’ and the plant species you would like to sponsor.  Your donation is tax deductible.”

You can vote once from a device (the miracle of technology can see if you voted before from the same machine), so make it count! Voting closes at noon on Thursday, June 28. We’ll announce the results and send out the money, just like that.

So here’s a quick look at the candidates. All descriptions are from Go Botany, a service of the New England Wildflower Society.

Trillium erectum | Credit: Wikimedia Commons - Valérie Luc (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Trillium erectum – red trillium | Credit: Wikimedia Commons – Valérie Luc (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Trillium erectum – red trillium: “Red wakerobin is a common trillium in moist deciduous, and sometimes mixed, forests throughout New England. The fetid smelling flowers attract carrion flies, which act as pollinators.”

Sibbaldiopsis tridentata - three-toothed cinquefoil | Credit: Wikimedia Commons: Christopher Hoess (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Sibbaldiopsis tridentata – three-toothed cinquefoil | Credit: Wikimedia Commons: Christopher Hoess (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Sibbaldiopsis tridentata – three-toothed cinquefoil: “Three-toothed cinquefoil is an attractive little native with woody lower stems and evergreen leaves. It is found on dry, rocky and sandy areas, including mountaintops, and thus makes a good rock garden ornamental.”

Chrysosplenium americanum - Water carpet | Credit: Wikimedia Commons - User: Richtid (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Chrysosplenium americanum – Water carpet | Credit: Wikimedia Commons – User: Richtid (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Chrysosplenium americanum – water carpet: “Golden-saxifrage is a tiny, mat-forming plant of wetlands and seeps. The inconspicuous flowers are noticeable only for their eight brick-red anthers when it blooms in May.”

Viburnum lantanoides - Hobblebush | Credit: Wikimedia Commons - User: Wladyslaw (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Viburnum lantanoides – Hobblebush | Credit: Wikimedia Commons – User: Wladyslaw (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Viburnum lantanoides – hobblebush: “Hobblebush inhabits the understory of cool forests. It produces flat-topped clusters of white flowers in two forms: 1) an outer ring of 3/4-inch wide, showy white flowers that are sterile, but may attract pollinators; and 2) an inner cluster of small greenish, fertile flowers. This shrub is a host plant for the caterpillars of the spring azure butterfly (Celastrina ladon).”

Help Us Pick a Baxter Plant

  • Trillium erectum - Red trillium (73%, 11 Votes)
  • Viburnum lantanoides - Hobblebush (27%, 4 Votes)
  • Sibbaldiopsis tridentata - Three-toothed cinquefoil (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Chrysosplenium americanum - Water carpet (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 15

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